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Diabetes Risk Panel with Score and Cardio IQ® Diabetes Risk Panel with Score

Test code(s) 92027(X) and 92026(X)

Question 1. Why are both glucose and hemoglobin A1c included in the Diabetes Risk Panel with Score?

Multiple studies have shown that testing both analytes identifies more individuals at risk for developing diabetes mellitus than testing either analyte alone.1,2,3 Identifying individuals in the prediabetes stage enables risk modification via changes in lifestyle and/or medication.

Question 2. What is the diabetes risk score?

The diabetes risk score is an indicator of a person’s risk of developing diabetes. It is based on laboratory test results (fasting glucose, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides), personal data (BMI and blood pressure), and family history. Points are assigned to each piece of information and an 8-year risk of developing diabetes is obtained from the cumulative score. This score, derived from the analysis of 3453 individuals (ages 30-79) within the Framingham cohort, complements measurement of blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c and can provide a useful tool for communicating diabetes risk to patients.4

Question 3. Can I calculate a diabetes 8-year risk myself?

Yes. A Framingham diabetes risk score online calculator is available at http://www.framinghamheartstudy.org/risk-functions/diabetes/index.php.

Question 4. No diabetes risk score was reported for my patient. Why?

An 8-year diabetes risk score will not be calculated when:

  • There is missing patient information. The following are required for 8-year risk estimates: age, gender, height, weight, blood pressure (systolic and diastolic), treatment for high blood pressure (yes or no), and parental history of diabetes mellitus (yes or no).
  • A patient’s information is not in the range accepted for risk calculation. Accepted ranges are:

       • Age: 30-79 years

       • Glucose: ≤125 mg/dL

       • Hemoglobin A1c: ≤6.4%

References
 
  1. Bernal-Lopez MR, Santamarıa-Fernandez S, Lopez-Carmona D, et al. HbA1c in adults without known diabetes from southern Europe. Impact of the new diagnostic criteria in clinical practice. Diabet Med. 2011;28:1319–1322.
  2. Schöttker B, Raum E, Rothenbacher D, et al. Prognostic value of haemoglobin A1c and fasting plasma glucose for incident diabetes and implications for screening. Eur J Epidemiol. 2011;26:779–787.
  3. Sato KK, Hayashi T, Harita N, et al. Combined measurement of fasting plasma glucose and A1C is effective for the prediction of type 2 diabetes: the Kansai Healthcare Study. Diabetes Care. 2009;32:644-646.
  4. Wilson PW, Meigs JB, Sullivan L, et al. Prediction of incident diabetes mellitus in middle-aged adults: the Framingham Offspring Study. Arch Intern Med. 2007;167:1068-1074.
This FAQ is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as medical advice. A physician’s test selection and interpretation, diagnosis, and patient management decisions should be based on his/her education, clinical expertise, and assessment of the patient.

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